Battle Of The Bags! Beardslee Public House Is Hosting It’s First Annual Cornhole Tournament

Cornhole-tournament-at-Beardslee-public-House-2018

Calling all Cornhole enthusiasts in Seattle!

Hook a hole at Beardslee Public House’s first Annual Kick Hunger Challenge Cornhole Tournament in Bothell on Sunday, July 22, when 48 teams will compete in a friendly game of Baggo — with winner’s prizes, corn dogs and John Howie Restaurant’s swag bags for all participants. What better way to enjoy a Seattle summer weekend?

 

Cornhole Tournament Kick Hunger Challenge John Howie Beardslee

 

The proceeds from the tournament will go to Food Lifeline as part of The Kick Hunger Challenge – a fundraising competition between all 32 National Football League teams to raise money for food banks nationwide.

TOURNAMENT DETAILS

Beardslee-Public-House-Cornhole-tournament Date:

July 22, 2018

 Time:

10 am (Check-in); 11 am (Play begins); 3:30 (Tournament ends)

 Cost:

$ 50 (Per team. 2 players per team)

 Tickets:

http://cornholeforacause.brownpapertickets.com

 Age Limit:

21+

 Format:

48 teams maximum total bracket play. Bracket play – 3 games guaranteed. Best record moves up to the next round.

 Prizes:

1st  Place – 2 –  $100. Beardslee Public House gift certificates (1 each)

2nd Place – 2 – $50. Beardslee Public House gift certificates (1 each)

3rd Place – 2- $25. Beardslee Public House gift certificates (1 each)

 Every Player Wins:

All participants will receive a swag bag worth $ 35 with complimentary cards for a free soup, salad, appetizer or dessert at any of John Howie’s restaurants (excluding SPORT Restaurant & Bar).

 Snacks:

Corn dogs will be available at the event for $1 each.

 Beneficiary:

Food Lifeline and Taste Of NFL’s Kick Hunger Challenge. Every one dollar raised at this event will buy for nutritious meals for the hungry.

“Every year, Chef John Howie and his team produce three large events for The Kick Hunger Challenge. The Annual Poker Event, Taste of the Seahawks and Dinner and Auction at SPORT Restaurant and Bar,” says Cathy Lalley, Director of Marketing at John Howie Restaurants. “The Cornhole tournament is our newest addition to the line-up. I wanted to create a casual, low-key event where people could come and enjoy a friendly outdoor game on the Beardslee premises, and I’m particularly excited about the involvement of our local community in Bothell.”

For those interested in knowing more about Cornhole before they sign up for the Beardslee tournament on July 22, here are a few fun facts:

Where Did Cornhole Tournaments Start?

 

Cornhole is one of the most popular outdoor games in the Midwestern states where farmland – and corn! – is plentiful. No backyard barbecue is complete in Cincinnati, Ohio, for example, without a Cornhole tournament, and locals say they invented the game. People from the state of Kentucky disagrees, because they believe it was one of their early pioneers who played the earliest version of Cornhole in the foothills of the Bluegrass State.

Some ascribe its origins to the Native Americans in Illinois who played with corn-stuffed bags made of dried animal bladders. And finally there’s a German claim in this light-hearted rivalry to establish Cornhole’s true provenance. Apparently, a German cabinet-maker named Matthias Kuepermann noticed young boys tossing rocks into a hole in the ground, and concerned for their safety, he gave them burlap bags filled with corn and wooden boxes instead. Something that kids played with in Germany.

But whoever may have invented the Cornhole Tournament, there is no doubt that it’s a simple, outdoor game that anybody can join in, and it’s unexpectedly fun!

3 Cornhole Pro Tips

#1: Hold the corn bag flat in your palm with four fingers underneath and your thumb on top. Your palm should be flat and facing upwards when you toss the bag. Don’t try to scrunch it up into a ball.

#2: Always aim for the middle of the board. Even if your bag doesn’t go into the hole, it will lie there on the board and get in your opponent’s way, in what is called a “blocker shot”.

# 3: Don’t wear sandals or flip-flops. Unless your feet are planted comfortably on the ground you can easily twist an ankle or mess your shots. Wear sports shoes instead.

Cornhole Terminology

Interestingly, there is a short lexicon of special words and phrases associated with the Cornhole game. See how many you can memorize before the Beardslee tournament this year:

• Ace or cow pie: A bag lands on the board, which is worth one point.

• Back door or Dirty Rollup: A cornhole that goes over the top of a blocker and into the hole.

• Backstop: A bag that lands past the cornhole but remains on the board creating a backboard for a slider to knock into without going off the board.

• Blocker: An ace that lands in front of the hole, essentially blocking the hole from sliders.

• Cornfusion: When players or teams cannot agree on the scoring of a given inning.

• Cornhole or Drano: A bag that falls in the hole, which is worth three points. The alternative name is a reference to a trademark, that of a sink clog clearing product.

• Cornholio: Same as grand bag or as just cornhole, depending on region; named for the alter-ego of the character Beavis in the animated TV series Beavis and Butt-Head.

• Cornucopia: Achieved when a player throws all four bags into the hole in one inning.

• Dirty bag: A bag that is on the ground or is hanging off the board touching the ground.

• Flop: Type of toss that didn’t spin the bag horizontally or vertically. Without rotation or spin.

• Grasshopper: A bag that bounces off the grass or ground and lands on the board for a point.

• Screaming Eagle: A bag that goes beyond the board without hitting the board. Screeching like an eagle is an additionally accepted reaction to making such a mistake.

• Slippery Granny: Scoring three bags in a row on the board only.

• Grand bag, Double Deuce: Four cornholes by a single player in a single round. There is a tradition in some areas where any casual player who puts all four bags in the hole on a single turn gets to sign the board, often with some type of ceremony and recognition.

• Trip Dip: When a single player cornholes 3 out of the 4 bags in a single round.

• Hanger or Shook: An ace on the lip of the hole ready to drop.

• Honors: The team who tosses first, resulting from the team scoring last.

• Hooker: A bag hitting the board and hooking or curving around a blocker and going in the hole.

• Jumper: A bag that strikes another bag on the board causing it to jump up into the cornhole.

• Madden: when a player violently throws the bag at the opposing player.

• Perrego: When a player refuses to play Baggo because they’re intimidated by their competitors.

• Police: The cornhole referee.

• Sally’ or Corn Patty: A toss that is thrown too weakly and lands on the ground before reaching the board.

• Shortbag: When a bag lands on the ground just before the cornhole board.

• Shucker: When a player pitches a bag and it strikes an opposing players bag knocking it off the board.

• Skunk: A game that, by some rules, ends in an 11–0 score.

• Slider: A cornhole that slides into the hole.

• Swish: A bag that goes directly in the hole without touching the board. More often referred to as ‘Airmail’

• Shotgun: Throwing all your bags at once.

• Wash: When each team has scored exactly the same number of points in an inning, thereby “washing out” all points scored in the inning. [Courtesy Wikipedia]

Leave a Comment