FACTS ABOUT STEAK THAT EVERY CONNOISSEUR SHOULD KNOW (PART 1)

Facts About Steak That Every Connoisseur Should Know

PORTERHOUSE AND T-BONE ARE NOT THE SAME STEAK

 Contrary to what a lot of people believe, a Porterhouse steak and a T-Bone steak are not the same thing. It is true that both are cut from the short loin area of the beef, but the Porterhouse is a much larger steak and can easily feed two. USDA specifications require the filet portion must be at least 1.25″ thick at its widest point to qualify labeling as a Porterhouse steak. A T-Bone, on the other hand, must be at least 0.25″ thick. Any smaller than that, it would be called a Club Steak.

 

NO NEED TO DRY-AGE A FILET MIGNON

 Popular wisdom has it that dry-aging a piece of filet mignon will further concentrate its flavor. A lot of steak pundits will tell you to buy a decent bit of filet mignon from the butcher and then dry-age it at home to kick up the taste, but the meat is so lean there is no fat to break down. The dry-aging process on a filet mignon therefore is rather a pointless exercise.

 

LET THE STEAK SIT IN SALT FOR 45 MINUTES

 Salt put a charred, crusty exterior on a steak, and helps to seal in all the wonderful juices as well. Just remember to let the steak sit in the salt for a good 45 minutes before you cook it. Salt tends to dissolve in the moisture it draws out from the meat, but an interval of about 45 minutes allows the moisture to turn back, leaving the salt in its hard, particle form to create that amazing crust.

 

DON’T FEAR OVER-SEASONING

 Don’t bother measuring the seasoning you rub onto a steak before throwing it on the grill. Most of the rub will fall into the fire as it cooks anyway, and you don’t want to risk an under-seasoned piece of good steak by erring on the side of caution.

 

LET THE GRILL GET REALLY HOT FIRST

 Don’t be in a hurry to put steaks on the grill. Give your heat source plenty of time to really build up before you introduce the meat. Not sure how hot is enough hot? Just hold your hands over the grate. If you cannot stand the heat for more than 2 seconds, your grill is ready.

 

DON’T USE A FORK TO HANDLE STEAK

 Forks puncture holes as you turn a steak around on the grill, releasing all the precious juices that should stay inside to add flavor and moisten up the meat. Use something blunt like tongs instead.

 

SEAR BOTH SIDES OF A STEAK BEFORE COOKING IT

 Hold the steak directly over a flame for at least 2 minutes on each side first. After that, go ahead and cook the meat until it is done. Searing both sides well first will seal in the moisture and make the steak extra juicy.

 

DO A STICKY TEST

 It’s hard to gauge sometimes when a steak is ready to be turned. If you’re unsure, then just check to see of the meat is sticking to grill. If it is, then the meat is not ready to be turned.

 

GIVE THE STEAK TIME TO REST

 Resting the cooked meat before serving it will send the juices back into the meat and it will not spill all over the plate. A good rule of thumb is to let the steak sit for about half the time you took to cook it.

 

AMERICANS LIKE BAKED POTATO WITH THEIR STEAK

 About 30 per cent of Americans will order a baked potato with their steak. Connoisseurs believe that is a waste of a pairing option when steakhouse side dishes have become so interesting and exciting in modern steakhouse menus.

 

OVERCOOKED STEAK IS BAD FOR YOUR HEALTH

 When beef is overcooked, the sugars, fat and protein in it gets fused together, making it hard to chew and difficult to digest. Meat that has been overcooked at a very high temperature has been linked to cancer, especially prostrate cancer for men.

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